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dux23Victoria, BCSince May 18, 200941 Reviews
Average Rating
3 (3.1)
  • Food3.5 (3.4)
  • Service3 (3)
  • Value3 (3.2)
  • Ambiance3 (2.8)

Reviews

Displaying 1 - 20 of 41 Reviews Found
House of Dosas1391 Kingsway, Vancouver
Mondays are the night! Half-price Dosas!
Submitted Wednesday, March 16, 2011 - 8:10pm [Dine in]

House of Dosas offers a solid meal no matter what you get (I eat their vegetarian food, but the meats are all halal meat -so high quality and compasssionately raised and slaughtered). The secret to this place is Mondays -when Dosas are only $5.99. They also serve a good selection of south asian beers and have cricket on the televisions for those who find that sport interesting to watch.

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Closed
OrganicLives1829 Quebec Street, Vancouver
Chili SANS Carne!
Submitted Wednesday, March 16, 2011 - 8:08pm [Dine in]

I'm ambivalent to the raw foods movement, but have had decent experiences at Cafe Bliss in Victoria and that place in the back of the produce stand on Commercial Drive. The cold carrot soup wasn't a hit at Organic Lives, but then I was pleasantly surprised by the warm "Chile Sans Carne". This is a chili without beans, chick peas and a perfectly cooked side of quinoa providing the protein content. This is probably the best vegetarian chili I've had eating at a restaurant (although I make better at home). The servers were exceptionally helpful, and I overheard them educating other customers (who probably had little knowledge of raw foods) without pretense which was nice. Overall a nice little spot. You can grab a seat looking into the kitchen too - and it seemed like kitchen staff were also engaged with customers.

This place is right by the downtown bus depot - so especially keep it in mind if you're en route to somewhere else via Vancouver and want a healthy meal.

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Maple Grill1967 West Broadway, Vancouver
Finally an actual Kosher restaurant!
Submitted Wednesday, March 16, 2011 - 8:03pm [Dine in]

Not that the deli's aren't good - but Vancouver has really needed a venue for sit-down dining. The space is elegant but modest enough that you don't have to feel like you have to dress up for lunch. There's also a kids menu. All the options are a good value, considering the outrageous prices of Kosher meat in Vancouver. We were satisfied with the food quality and portions, and the server was gracious and kept an eye on the needs of the room - even when it got busy (there was only one server).

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Big Bad John's919 Douglas Street, Victoria
Best Watering Hole in Town!
Submitted Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 11:23pm [Dine in]

Big Bad John's is THE bar in town if you don't want any pretense whatsoever. And by pretense I mean the full spectrum from poseur hip-hop gangstas in Top 40 dance clubs to obnoxious indie hipsters who think they're so ironic and cool.

At Big Bad John's you get straight up service, including free shelled peanuts which enevitably lead to shenanigans in the back of the bar (peanut shell wars for the most part). Chances are you'll find yourself sitting next to someone you'd never dream of talking to on the street - and by the end of the night you're best drinking buddies. The surreal log-cabin redneckish environs is cozy and so over-the-top that no one takes themselves too seriously - which makes for a great melting pot environment.

Foodwise - you can get food from the same kitchen that serves the Sticky Wicket - and it will seem better at Big Bad Johns because it's not pretending to be a pub or restaurant.

The only qualm is the shared washroom facilities with the hotel. It would be nice if they built some sort of crazy Big Bad John's styled washroom so you don't hit the sterile and sobering hallways and washrooms of the Strathcona inbetween drinks.

Nonetheless - this should remain a mainstay of Victoria nightlife for years to come. A must-see for any visitor, if only for a couple drinks before a night on the town.

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Sticky Wicket, The919 Douglas Street, Victoria
This is a pub?
Submitted Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 11:11pm [Dine in]

While one can see some original fixtures like the bar, chandeliers and wall mirrors that speak to a previous incarnation of a pub - the Sticky Wicket presently offers a lowest common denominator experience that every other room in the Strathcona seems to share (with the exception of Big Bad Johns, which remains one of the best-value drinking holes in Victoria).

We ordered a pint of Guinness and a pint of Kilkenny, and when the Guinness came in less than 20 seconds we knew that although we were seated at the bar - something was amiss. Clearly the bartender cared more about watching the game on the massive big screens than properly pouring a Guinness (which should take about a minute to do). I could understand if it was smoking busy, but there were only a handful of customers at the bar, all of whom were nursing relatively full drinks.

The former ambiance (I do remember when the Sticky Wicket was more pub-like back in the 90s) has been washed out by the light pollution of big screen TVs on all sides, which have rendered the Sticky Wicket's most authentic room a clash of cultures (if UK football was screened it would be much more tolerable than NBA and fight night). The other rooms no longer connect to the bar area in terms of aesthetic flow - and without the link to the heritage aspects around the bar, have the feel of a family restaurant - like a Denny's if Denny's had a bit more budget for wood fixtures.

Speaking of Denny's - I guess the decorum in the other main L-shaped room is appropriate, given the sad decline of food at the Sticky Wicket (although friends who grew up here have said the food has always been of a low calibre). The pub natchos were drab compared to other Victoria restaurants, which is pretty bad because quality pub natchos are a tall order in this city for some reason.

Value for the money? Meh. The "pints" we ordered were served in "sleeves" (I think bar staff should specify when customers order "pints" that they only serve beer in smaller sleeve glasses) - so instead of $7.50 like at Irish Times for a true 500 ml pint of Guinness, we paid $5.50 for what was surely less than 400 ml. I suspect these sleeves were designed to hold a 355ml can of beer. The food, however, costs about the same as any other pub in town - and is thus not good value for the money.

I guess the transition to a "something-for-everybody" sort of philosophy has worked for the Strathcona marketing strategy, but it's sapped the cultural experience out of what used to be a nice room. You'd think the sports-bar thing could have been left to the Clubhouse and rooftop venue and games room. I assume when Irish Times opened much of their clientele seeking a more authentic UK pub experience shifted over, with Smiths Pub and The Bard & Banker hammering the final nails in the coffin.

As we left, American cock-rock started blaring over a PA system as a final reminder as to why we won't come back.

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Beagle Pub301 Cook Street, Victoria
A loud and expensive experience
Submitted Wednesday, June 30, 2010 - 11:23am [Dine in]

I don't know what it is about the Cook St Village that mediocre restaurant owners can add $1.50 onto the price of a beer or $2.50 onto the price of an average entree. It's like people have to pay for the privilege of being in the Cook St Village. While prices suit the immediate market of young urban professionals, it lends a certain plasticity to the notion of a neighbourhood or neighbourly pub. At least restaurants in expensive neighbourhoods like Kitslano (Vancouver's Cook St equivalent) deliver in terms of environment and food. The Beagle is like an independently owned Kelsey's or Moxie's grill in the middle of the Cook St village.

We had Nachos - and while they were better than most in Victoria (like Pizza though, Victoria doesn't really have a "great" Nachos experience anywhere) - I just couldn't get over the pricepoint. $6.50 local draught beer is highway robbery. And it does nothing to slow down or tame the Beagle clientele - who in my 3 visits there seem to be loud, obnoxious sports fans and yahoos. No real culture here.

If you seek a good meal with a decently priced selection of drinks, you're better off hitting up the cold beer and wine store across the street from the Beagle (even though they too charge more than other cold beer and wines, at least it's not Cook St. Bar prices), and getting take-away from the indoor mall off of McKenzie and Cook - featuring sushi, awesome African food, Thai and a Cafe Fanstico. You're bound to get better conversation in at the beach, Beacon Hill Park or back at home than at the Beagle.

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James Bay Fish & Chips211 Menzies Street, Victoria
A Fabulous Reinvention of a tired restaurant / The BEST CHOW MEIN in Victoria
Submitted Wednesday, June 30, 2010 - 11:08am [Dine in]

Chinese food is proletariat food. Elegant dining rooms in Chinatown, or bistro-style diggs are a farce.
James Bay Fish and Chips used to be a greasy dive with solid fish and chips. The recipe for the fist and chips hasn't changed since the new owners gutted the place and added an extensive selection of Chinese fare to the menu. You can tell they're serious because they have the balls to put a glass window so you can see everything going on in the kitchen (most Chinese restaurants keep their kitchens hidden from public view, and for good reason!). The kitchen is clean, the staff highly skilled and professional - and the food reflects this. Easily the best chow mein I've had in town, and they will adapt recipes to suit dietary needs. The fish and chips have remained as solid as ever, although the batter is lighter - probably because the oil is being changed more often than the old James Bay Fish and Chips. For the price, these are some of the better Fish and Chips plates you can get in town. It may not be Barb's or RedFishBlueFish - but it beats the rest.

The gentleman who runs the place is geniunely interested in the clientele, their experience, and intuitively knows their needs (i.e. - attentive to people with kids, etc). For the money, this is easily the best restaurant in James Bay and even though I've recently moved to the Fairfield area I keep going back.

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Khona Cafe1090 Fort St, Victoria
A decent coffee and even better tea, close (or closish) to Fairfield / Cook St Village
Submitted Thursday, June 24, 2010 - 1:43pm [Dine in]

I like near the Cook St village and have yet to find a satisfying barrista experience. Sure, Starbucks and Serious give the expected standards - but I'm talking out of an independent outfit that approaches coffee from the perspective of artistry and not just as a business. Yes, I know about the Cafe Fantastico in the Cook St Village - but it doesn't compare to the original on Kings (great coffee there). Mocha House and Bubby Rose's have entirely failed me for coffee (although Bubby Rose is a fantastic bakery).

I've walked by Khona so many times over the years - but have always had somewhere to go that took priority to taking 5-10 minutes to see what it was about. Finally, I have perspective and am happy to report I've found some decent coffee and even better tea that's close to home.

The "Afrikhona" was smooth and silky with the right punch of coffee. Aside from Cafe Fantastico on Kings and Habit on Pandora - so many coffee houses simply come up short - making this drink seemed watery and weak. The notes detected in the coffee make me look forward to trying it neat as an espresso.

Their tea, however - is most excellent. They steep it for you because different teas require different brewing techniques - so you'll get a perfect cup of tea every time. I'm not sure who their source is for tea, but they're definitely doing it right.

They also sell Mattcha drinks, so they'll be having more than a few visits out of me in the future. That they are on the way to my work from Cook St. village only bodes well for them.

If, like me, you've passed by Khona a million times - take my advice and take the time to check it out someday.

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Ali Baba Pizza775 Fort St, Victoria
A camera in the kitchen, really?
Submitted Sunday, June 20, 2010 - 9:07pm [Dine in]

I gave Ali Baba another chance, if only because they were the only thing open at 10:30 am. I previously vowed to boycott them after they started refusing their own pizza cards rather than give the respect any regular customer base deserves in having them grandfathered out (not issuing any more new ones).

The multigrain pizza reminded me of an old overflowing ashtray, even though it tasted like previously frozen wheat. The toppings and sauce were ok but couldn't overcome the crust and the fact that the temperature of the slice was what I can only describe as "tepid" and probably a breeding ground for all manner of bacteria. For $4.25, it's hardly value for your money given the competition downtown.

Victoria still awaits a decent pizza place, but there's better than this.

Eating in, with little more eye candy than a small television up in the corner - I began to notice some of the security features in the restaurant... particularly the plethora of cameras. Three in the front room seemed a little excessive - like they were serving Pho soup in Burnaby at 4 in the morning or something.

Then I noticed they had a camera in the kitchen! Given we're talking street-level pizza, I'd say the fact of a camera in the kitchen area where food is prepped does not inspire confidence in the product. Either the management are control freaks, or the staff truly can't be trusted to perform. Given the crust, I'd lean to the latter - but in any case it's quite strange and makes me want to never go back (even to order at home, which Ali Baba was at one point a stand-by).

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Pizzeria Prima Strada230 Cook Street, #105, Victoria
Value is lost when you don't have your service together.
Submitted Sunday, April 25, 2010 - 7:44pm [Dine in]

I will start by saying that this ranks among the best pizza you can get in Victoria. I will give them that.
However, their stature is marginal when you factor in what they charge. I am sure they're paying premium rates for the space their in, and there's not really any other options for the Cook St. Village clientele, who are for the most part affluent and wouldn't think about how much they're paying for dinner. $45 for two people to dine on pizza and have sleeves of local beer is steep in my books.

The funghi was great, fantastic carmelized onions approaching a confit merges with two types of mushroom and a delectable cream sauce. That pizza stood on its own. I ordered the Romana and the whole time was comparing it with a similar pizza at Fifth St which goes for $5 less. There's more care in the ingredients, particularly the crust at Prima Strada, but ultimately I am still wondering if it's worth it given the rest of the package that came with our meal.

Upon arriving, there was a large line-up and it was unclear what system they were using to fill the tables. There were about 4 empty tables and no one in line had their name in for them. Clearly what they are doing is a courtesy call and folks are walking back from other parts of the Cook St village shopping area - or perhaps even Beacon Hill Park given the length some of these tables sat empty. We didn't quite get what was going on and the hostess, who was also playing server (bad move for a place this busy), seemed impatient that it was our first time there and we didn't know the drill. We were told 15 minutes and were seated 20 minutes later. Forgivable given how slammed they were.

The two pizzas came 7 minutes apart from each other, and getting the bill taken care of required the guy who appeared to be the owner/manager coming to our table after waiting for about 5-10 minutes. He took the cheque to our waitress who brought our change. None of the staff acknowledged us after we had requested our bill. There seemed to be an air of knowing they are the best pizza place in town and that it didn't matter what type of service we had because they'd continue being the best.

Pizza to me is proletariat food, and I think a more down-to-earth approach is a better way to go. Pizzeria Prima Strada has managed to make the best pizza in Victoria, but they need to work on creating a better atmosphere. Better service and restaurant management would go a long way towards this. The atmosphere at the best pizza places I've been to are created by the people who work there. This experience was disappointing (not to mention after paying $23 for a pizza and beer, it wasn't the most filling meal either) but they are new and worth giving another chance. If they get their act together, they'll undoubtedly rule the pizza scene here indefinitely. It is unbecoming to carry an air of premature arrogance with respect to that title in the present however.

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Rathskeller Schnitzel Haus1205 Quadra St, Victoria
Boots of Beer, and that's about it.
Submitted Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 10:41pm [Dine in]

How long will the Rathskellaer last when Germans themselves no longer eat this way?

The boots of beer are a great novelty, and the Wheat Beer (we sampled the Koenig and the Dark Wheat) was indeed a treat - but food-wise the whole menu is filled relics and little of substance. Don't ever go here if you're a vegetarian who is looking for a meal beyond some appies (served an hour too late even though the restaurant is empty) and the aforesaid boot of beer. They will dismiss you as riff-raff just there for the beer, even though you might genuinely want to drop $30 on a meal.

$30 is about what you'll pay for a meal, by the way, if you get an appetizer with it. (Heads up: boots of beer run $15 to $30 depending on size.) I'm sorry, but $2 for a potato pancake that's less than 0.5 cm thin and 4 inches wide isn't a great deal... nor is half a Kraft Camembert with some store-bought jarred cranberry sauce ($7), no matter what type of flour you coat it in before you deep fry it. The lox was clearly something that had been sitting pre-plated in a fridge, wrapped in saran. The hardboiled egg slices were wrinkling like a dead person's skin. Six slices of lox, a hardboiled egg and 8 capers on a piece of lettuce is not worth $9.

When the last of the 80-something crowd die off, I'm not sure how long the Rathskeller will last. The ambiance is kitchy (I'm sure it's WAY better with the accordion player) and the boot of beer great entertainment, but the food is an uneventful rip-off and the service terrible. By the Little Piggy's review, they treat young people who come just for the boots with great disdain (evidently the 2L boot should be shared, and I personally share the Rathskeller's position on this). But at the same time, the tired old traditional fare is going to die with that generation - and maybe it's high time they consider either adding 21st Century (or should I say late 20th century) German fare to the menu, or simply turn themselves into a polka bar where we can simply come for boots and a good time.

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Brickyard, The784 Yates Street, Victoria
Brickyard redeemed.
Submitted Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 3:11pm [Dine in]

I recently gave the Brickyard another shot, as I hadn't seen the hipster scene of young kids drinking out front for a while. They lost their liquor license, and I think some changes were made... good ones from what I could tell.

The new, non-prentious staff were attentive and friendly. It seems a throwback to the way The Brickyard was in the early 2000s, a solid place to get a slice of pizza. The pizza's the same, and there was a good mix of people there.

I'm glad they decided against the business strategy of alienating anyone who wasn't in their early 20s. I don't know if it was management's call, or maybe the hipster staff left because they couldn't serve their underage friends anymore - but whatever happened - it's back to normal. Hurrah.

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Bent Mast, The512 Simcoe St, Victoria
The smell of urinal pucks and rat poison do not help the palette
Submitted Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 3:02pm [Dine in]

There's something about the heritage building that The Bent Mast is situated in. Although they periodically get called on their cleanliness controls by the VIHA inspectors, I can't really fault the staff of a building that seems (and sometimes smells) like there's dead things in the walls. I catch whiffs of mildew sometimes, other times I get nose full of strange cleaners, I can't tell if it's carpet cleaner, bathroom sanitizer or some sort of pest control chemical. Given the quality of food often served (a lot of it seems like it's take-aways from the Thrifty's across the street), I'm not sure if I'm glad I can't smell the kitchen or not. I've had everything from tepid borscht, to burnt "medium-rare" blade steaks (for $17!) to limp grease-saturated fries. I've also had more tolerable food, but there seems to be a frequent change-over in staff that doesn't lead to consistency from the kitchen or the servers.

The Bent Mast is probably the best, affordable outdoor patio in James Bay or lower Cook Street village, so I don't expect them to go away or change too soon. It can have a great neighbourhood pub vibe on warm summer nights when things are hopping under the tiki torches outside. Sadly, because of their license, the Bent Mast can't roll with what makes them truly popular (a great place for pitchers of beer), and occasionally you get a rather aggressive server trying to tell you that you can't drink beer without ordering food as well. Despite the smells, I'll still probably keep going back nonetheless.

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Red Fish, Blue Fish1006 Wharf Street, Victoria
Avoid the deepfryer, go for the Tacones!
Submitted Tuesday, February 2, 2010 - 2:58pm [Dine in]

I was excited to see Red Fish, Blue Fish reopen this month - as i just started a new job nearby and had been itching for fish and chips. Arriving on their second day of business after an unknown hiatus (I heard two months), I expected their deep fryer to deliver less of a heavy dose than previous experiences there. Not so. The chips looked and felt like they'd been sweated in lard for a few days. While the green onions brightened up the palette a bit, the curry sauce was like a blob of river otter scat plopped on top. This was my third bleh deepfryer experience at Red Fish, Blue Fish - and I vow it to be my last.

The Salmon Tacone, however, was still well up to snuff and Red Fish, Blue Fish deliver one of the best values for lunch in Victoria in this regard. Service was fast (within 5 minutes - although it is February, so no half-hour inner harbour tourist lineup) and the outdoor seating arrangement by the harbour the usual pleasure in the rare glimpse of sun this week.

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Village Restaurant, The2518 Estevan Ave., Victoria
One of the better restuarants in the Uvic area
Submitted Monday, January 18, 2010 - 1:45pm [Dine in]

There's not many restaurants in the vicinity of UVic that one could write home about. Not so with the Village Restaurant. A modest but elegant dining room, excellent service and a diverse menu that includes "kosher style" foods (basically Jewish food but not a kosher kitchen, although I don't recall seeing pork products on the menu). I had a vegetarian sandwich, the portions were solid and they obviously take care in their ingredients purchasing. This is a family-run restaurant that rides a wonderful line - balancing all the intimate and friendly aspects of a mom-and-pop business with the professionalism of contemporary culinary craft.

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Daidoco633 Courtney Street, #22, Victoria
Is this Victoria's answer to Guu?
Submitted Thursday, January 14, 2010 - 4:58pm [Dine in]

Daidoco is a Japanese lunch joint down by the Bug Zoo, and a fantastic cultural and culinary experience. The atmosphere is modest but elegant, with a cafeteria style counter. Some items are made-to-order, but usual come with 5 minutes making it perfect for half-hour lunches. The staff is pleasant and polite (not boisterous and entertaining like the Guu folks on Robson) and while there may be a bit of a language barrier, they make up for this with signs listing all the ingredients of each dish (most ingredients are organic, and meats are all free-range and local). Price range is under $10 for a light lunch, no more than $15 if you're really hungry. This is one of the healthiest lunches in Victoria, so while the portions may be a bit smaller, you still come away totally satisfied by the nutritional content.

I ordered Poke-Tuna, marinaded albacore in sesame oil and soy sauce with organic greens, green onion, celery, nori seaweed - light spicing - an excellent starter. $4!

The main was the special of the day - a sauteed rockfish with an exquisite organic baby greens sauce with steamed cabbage, kale and fajioli beans. $7!

The dining room is comfortable and relatively quiet (excellent for lunch meetings of less than 4 people), a bit of tasteful jazz in the background. I sat at the window bar - perfect to eat and go.

I brought my plate back to the counter, and the chef was geniunely grateful for my having eaten there and pleased that I had a great experience. It wasn't gratitude in a ching-ching we'll make more money sense - but the gratitude of someone who knows their craft and the business generated through their venture is merely the vehicle with which to share the love. I wish them many years of success!

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3G Vegetarian Restaurant3424 Cambie St, Vancouver
The new Buddhist Vegetarian
Submitted Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 6:35pm [Dine in]

3G supply all the other mock-meat Buddhist veg joints in town - so of course it naturally follows that they'll do it the best themselves. Since the fire and subsequent closure of the Buddhist Vegetarian on Pender at Main - I've been searching for another to compare. This restaurant at least meets if not exceeds those expectations. Well worth the trek out of the downtown core to explore the masters of the craft of mock-meats.

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Foundation, The2301 Main Street, Vancouver
Hipster Hangout
Submitted Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 12:41pm [Dine in]

There's not a lot to complain about with The Foundation (unless you had eaten there during their Hepatitis A scare. The menu offerings are simple and effective, perhaps too much so as I've taken several of their recipes and easily replicated them at home - often improving on the originals by using higher quality ingredients. The price point is fair, however, for both dinner and drinks... and with their younger less affluent hipster clientele (seemed like students mostly) they have to keep it on the cheap. The corners cut in terms of food quality are excused when the context is put into perspective, because after a couple of pitchers of sangria you're not going to be too discerning about such things.

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Spinnakers Gastro Brewpub & Guesthouse308 Catherine St., Victoria
A sudden decline?
Submitted Tuesday, November 3, 2009 - 4:10pm [Dine in]

I'm not sure what's going on at Spinnakers these days.

Maybe they run a totally different show upstairs in the pub - but they shouldn't given the prices are the same.

I've traditionally made a point of bringing anyone from out-of-town who likes microbrewed beer here for the "beer and artisan cheese" and "beer and truffles" pairings - and it's been a great experience everytime.

Not this time, however. It seemed like everything that came to our table had been sitting in a fridge. The flatbread crackers that come with the cheese were soggy as if they'd been collecting condensation in the cooler - plates set out (it came out WAY too fast given how many people were there) in the back ready to go. The portions were easily 2/3rds of what we had had two months ago! The salad was soggy in a left-over dressed green salad sort of way. The chicken wings were a half-assed Franks hot sauce travesty, with a blue cheese dip that tasted like wax. The kicker was that half of the beers seemed not-so-carbonated (a problem spinnakers has with its bottled product, but one I haven't encountered getting it from the tap before) when they first arrived.

What made this exceptionally bad is that this was a large going-away party for a friend who's moving to Manitoba - so it seemed such a slap in the face to give a group that populated 1/3rd of the seats in the upstairs pub such a lame experience. All of us had frequented Spinnakers throughout the years, and it seemed like the sendoff was to the idea of ever patronizing this restaurant again.

It's sad, because it used to be amazing. It will take quite some time for me to feel like risking a night out there again (especially in light of other more recent negative reviews). We'll stick with truffles from their downstairs shop and make our own artisan cheese and chocolate pairings at home with Phillips beer and the Artisan cheeses Spinnakers serves, but which can be bought for far less at Thrifty's deli.

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Cafe Bliss556A Pandora Avenue, Victoria
Update - new furniture! expanded seating!
Submitted Wednesday, September 30, 2009 - 12:04am [Dine in]

I stand by my previous review, but upon my return there the other night was pleased to see expanded seating. Their desserts and smoothies are well worth a gander as well.

I lament that they aren't open past 6:30, as I often feel like some of their offerings in the late dinner hours. I can see that most of their menu would probably sit best with a lunch crowd, and dwindling numbers in the later evening would make it hard to balance the books while keeping the freshness factor amped as it is. I'd rather have to plan to be there before 6:30 than have dehydrating ick from a buffet like at that other nearby vegan restaurant open later hours.

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